Timeline

Historical Timeline

1911

The official opening and dedication of the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada occurred on October 30, 1911

1911

Ottomar Lincke was the acting President of the Seminary from 1911-1914

1913

The Women's Auxiliary of Waterloo Lutheran Seminary was founded on February 27, 1913

1914

Dr. Preston Laury was the President of the Seminary from 1914-1918

1914

The cornerstone laying ceremony for Old Main took place in 1914

1914

In 1914, Rev. Nils Willison became the first graduate of the Seminary

1915

In 1915, "Old Main" (later to become Willison Hall) was opened

1918

Carroll Herman Little served as acting President of the Seminary from 1918-1920

1918

In 1918, additional courses were offered which would lead to a full arts course and the completion of a Bachelor of Arts

1920

Rev. Dr. Emil Hoffmann was the President of the Seminary from 1920-1926

1922

The first Waterloo College School rugby team was established in 1922

1924

In 1924, the Faculty of Arts was established and Waterloo College was created

1924

In 1924, an Eastern Wing was added to Willison Hall

1925

On February 18, 1925, Waterloo College became affiliated with the University of Western Ontario

1926

In 1926, the first issue of the Cord was published

1927

Ernst Neudoerffer, Jr. was the President of Waterloo College from 1927-1930

1928

In 1928, the original Seagram Memorial Field was opened

1929

In April 1929, Waterloo College experienced a financial crisis

1929

In spring 1929, the decision to admit female students was made

1930

Frederick B. Clausen was the President of Waterloo College from 1930-1942

1931

In 1931, Louise Kathleen Twietmeyer became the first female student to graduate from Waterloo College

1931

In 1931, enrolment had increased to 55 students, from 35 the previous year

1935

In 1935, Waterloo College hosted the first Invitation Games

1940

In 1940, the Waterloo College detachment of the University of Western Ontario Contingent was established

1942

In 1942, C.H. Little became acting President of Waterloo College

1944

Helmut T. Lehmann was the President of Waterloo College from 1944-1953

1945

Many Waterloo College graduates served and fell during WWII

1946

In 1946, Lincke House became the first women's residence

1950

In 1950, the first annual Boar's Head Dinner occurred

1950

In 1950, the first Keystone yearbook was published

1952

On November 1, 1952, the first permanent women's residence was dedicated

1952

During the winter of 1952-1953, the Dining Hall and kitchen were built

1953

J.G. Hagey was President of Waterloo College from 1953-1959

1953

In 1953, the first Homecoming took place.

1954

In 1954, extensive renovations were made to Willison Hall

1954

In 1954, the new Arts building was completed

1954

In 1954, the first issue of the Waterlooan was published

1956

A non-denominational Board of Governors was organized in 1956

1957

On September 19, 1957 the cornerstone laying ceremony for Seagram Stadium occurred

1959

In 1959, the Associate Faculties applied to the Provincial Legislature for a University charter

1960

On June 30, 1960 Waterloo College's affiliation with the University of Western Ontario was terminated

1960

On July 1, 1960 Waterloo Lutheran University began its first year as a degree granting institution

1960

William J. Villaume was President of Waterloo Lutheran University from 1960-1966

1960

In 1960, a full-time honours business program commenced

1960

In 1960, the first annual Winter Carnival took place

1961

The Hon. William Daum Euler was the 1st Chancellor of Waterloo Lutheran University

1961

The students of Waterloo Lutheran University began the annual Shinerama fundraiser during Frosh Week

1962

In 1962, the new Seminary was constructed

1962

Construction on several additional buildings was completed

1964

The Hon. W. Ross Macdonald became Chancellor of Waterloo Lutheran University

1965

The Council of Graduate Studies in Arts was launched in 1965

1965

In 1965, the Library was completed

1965

In 1965, the 1000th degree granted was presented to Margaret Ann Elash

1966

In 1966, the Faculty of Social Work was established

1967

The 1967/1968 Men's Basketball team won the National Championship

1967

Frank C. Peters was President of Waterloo Lutheran University from 1967-1978

1967

In 1967, Alumni Hall was constructed

1969

In 1969, the Dr. Alvin Woods Building was constructed

1970

In 1970, the Student Union Building was constructed

1972

The Hon. Paul Joseph Martin was Chancellor from June 1972 to April 1977

1973

In 1973, the Athletic Complex was completed

1973

In 1973, Waterloo Lutheran University received its new charter as the provincially funded Wilfrid Laurier University

1973

In 1973, six residence buildings were renamed

1974

In 1974, Wilfrid Laurier University introduced co-operative education

1974

On January 17th 1974, Radio Lutheran became Radio Laurier

1974

In August 1974, the Turret's grand opening occurred

1975

Two new faculties were formed in 1975

1977

In 1977, Earle Shelley was named Alumnus of the Century

1977

The Hon. John Black Aird was Chancellor from July 1977 to July 1985

1978

Neale H. Tayler was the President of Wilfrid Laurier University from 1978 to 1982

1980

On February 20th 1980, the official opening of the Frank C. Peters building occurred

1981

In 1981, the first Boost Alcohol Consciousness Concerning the Health of University Students (BACCHUS) in Canada started at Laurier

1982

John A. Weir was President of Wilfrid Laurier University from 1982 to 1992

1983

In 1983, the first issue of The Laureate was published

1984

In 1984, a two-floor addition on the Library was completed

1985

The Women's Curling team won an OWIAA title

1986

Maureen Forrester was Chancellor from May 1986 to May 1990

1986

Bouckaert Hall residence was opened in 1986

1988

In 1988, the John Aird Centre was opened

1990

The Hon. Willard Z. Estey was Chancellor from July 1990 to October 1995

1991

In 1991, the Golden Hawks Football team won the Vanier Cup

1991

On November 19, 1991, the grand opening of Bricker Residence was held

1991

In 1991, Peer Help Line was established

1992

In 1992, the Women's Soccer team won the national CIAU Championship

1992

In 1992, Foot Patrol began operating

1992

Lorna Marsden was President of Wilfrid Laurier University from 1992 to 1997

1994

In 1994, the Emergency Response team began operating

1995

In 1995, the Women's Soccer team won the national CIAU Championship

1995

On January 23, 1995, the official opening of the Science Building was held

1995

In 1995, Laurier University Charity Kouncil (L.U.C.K.) was established

1996

John E. Cleghorn became Chancellor of Wilfrid Laurier University

1997

Robert G. Rosehart was President of Wilfrid Laurier University from 1997 to 2007

1999

In 1999, Laurier's Brantford Campus was opened

2000

In 2000, the A-Team was established

2000

In 2000, the Faculty of Science became a stand-alone faculty at Laurier

2000

In 2000, the Men's Soccer team won the CIAU National Championship

2001

In 2001, the Men's Soccer team won the National Championship

2002

In 2002, the Schlegel Centre for Entrepreneurship building was opened

2002

In 2002, Waterloo College Hall opened

2003

The Hon. Robert Rae was Chancellor from September 2003 to March 2008

2004

In 2004/2005 the Women's Hockey team won the CIS Championship

2005

In 2005, the Football team won the Vanier Cup

2006

In 2006, Laurier's Faculty of Social Work relocated to downtown Kitchener

2006

In 2006, the Student Food Bank was established

2007

In 2007, an office in China was opened

2007

In 2007, the Faculty of Education was officially opened

2007

In 2007, the Laurier Cheerleading team were named National Champions.

2007

In 2007, the new Centre for Co-operative Education and Career Development was opened

2007

In 2007/2008 the Women's Curling team won the National Championship

2007

In 2007, Max Blouw was installed as President of the University

2007

In 2007/2008 the Men's Curling team won the National Championship

2008

In 2008, John Pollock became Chancellor of Wilfrid Laurier University

2008

In 2008/2009, the Women's Curling team won the National Championship

2009

In 2009, the Toronto Office was opened

2010

In October 2010, Laurier’s 100th anniversary celebrations were launched

1911
Opening Day Ceremony Crowd

When the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Canada wanted to establish a Theological Seminary in co-operation with the Synod of Central Canada, Toronto was chosen as the desired location after the first joint meetings on June 30 and July 1, 1910.

At a meeting on March 28, 1911, a gift of five acres of land on Albert Street was offered by the Board of Trade of Waterloo on behalf of its citizens to the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Canada. At their next meeting on May 23, 1911, it was agreed that the proposed Seminary would be located in Waterloo. The official opening and dedication of Waterloo Lutheran Seminary was on October 30, 1911. The service began at 2:00p.m. at St. John's Church before a congregation of approximately 1,500 people.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1911
Ottomar Lincke

Lincke was also the first and only faculty member when the Seminary opened with four students in 1911.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1913
Jacob Conrad and Clara Conrad

The Women's Auxiliary was organized in order to increase interest in the programs and needs of the Waterloo Lutheran Seminary, especially focusing on the training of men and women committed to a Christian ministry.

The first president and founder of the Women's Auxiliary was Mrs. J. Conrad. Other members of the first executive were: Mrs. H. A. Hagen, Mrs. F. Stahlschmidt and Mrs. M. J. Bieber.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1914
Dr. Preston Laury

Dr. Laury was also the dean and professor of systematic theology at the Seminary and was instrumental in starting Waterloo College School, which offered preparatory courses separate from the theological courses offered through the Seminary.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1914
The cornerstone laying ceremony for Old Main (later renamed Willison Hall)

Excavations using horses began in 1914 for the construction of what would later become Willison Hall. Later that year, the cornerstone laying ceremony occurred and the building was completed the following year.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1914
Nils Willison (1880-1964)

There were only four students who attended Waterloo Lutheran Seminary when it opened, Nils Willison being one of them, along with C.F. Christensen, H. Rembe and W. Bitzer. In the spring of 1914, Rev. Nils Willison became the first graduate of the Seminary. Willison later became a professor of Waterloo College from 1918-1928 and was also a member of the Board of Governors of Waterloo College and Seminary for 12 years. Today, Wilfrid Laurier University's Willison Hall is named in his honour.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1915
Students outside the completed Willison Hall

On the shoulders are Carl Cronmiller and Gerald Hagey and on the bottom, Gerald Ernst, Harry Baetz, Arthur Mehlenbacher, George Innes and Norman Keffer.

Old Main was built at a cost of $40,000. The building contained accommodations for the students, a dining hall, classrooms and other facilities.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1918
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958)

C.H. Little was also a Lutheran minister, professor and administrator at the Waterloo Lutheran Seminary and Waterloo College.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1918
Waterloo College and Seminary student body and faculty of 1922-1923 standing outside Willison Hall

The faculty began concentrating on a three-year high school course and a one-year Arts course, resulting in new faculty hires to accommodate for the exceptional growth.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1920
Rev. Dr. Emil Hoffmann

Rev. Dr. Emil Hoffmann also was the minister who dedicated the Seminary building at its opening on October 30, 1911.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1922
Waterloo College School's first rugby team

Back row: Herebert Schildroth, Paul Hauch, Clarence Block, Hugh Whitteker, Norbert Mueller, Albert Lotz and Harry Baetz

Centre Row: Louise Bald, Edward Heldman, unknown, unknown, unknown, Cuyler Hauch and Edwin Hauch

Front Row: unknown, Lloyd Ciceri, unknown, Werner Schnarr, Gerald Hagey, unknown and James Vorkoper

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1924
Graduating Class of 1923-1924

After several meetings between the faculty and the Board of Governors, the Board announced on May 30, 1924 that a Faculty of Arts would be established. A three-year Arts course was offered and the fourth year was outlined. After registration day on September 17, 1924, the first class consisted of twenty-four students.

The faculty consisted of Alex O. Potter, Ph.D., Dean and Professor of Philosophy and Social Sciences, Roy J. E. Hirtle, M.Sc., Professor of Science and Mathematics, Rev. Seward W. Hirtle, B.A., Professor of Latin and Greek, Rev. H. Schorten, Professor of Modern Languages, Rev. Nils Willison, Lit.D., Professor of English and Rev. A. A. Zinck, Professor of the English Bible.

1924
Willison Hall with new wing

The new wing of Willison Hall, which doubled the building's capacity cost $30,000. The full building contained classrooms, laboratories, a gymnasium, library, chapel, dormitories as well as a dining room.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1926
The cover of the May 1948 edition of the Waterloo College Cord

Originally named the Waterloo College Cord, The Cord, is a weekly newspaper that has grown to be produced by a team of over 70 volunteers and an editorial board of 15.

1925
Alex O. Potter

Alex O. Potter, who taught at the college, was instrumental in securing the affiliation with the University of Western Ontario.

The first class under this affiliation consisted of: John E. Miller, Harry William Baetz, Norman Keffer, Carl Frederick Klinck, Albert Lotz and Garnet Schultz. Carl Frederick Klinck and Harry William Baetz were placed first and second at the graduation exercises on May 27, 1927 among all eighty-five students from the University of Western Ontario and its affiliated colleges.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1927
Ernst Neudoerffer, Jr. (1877-1973)

Neudoerffer was born in San Leopoldina, Brazil and moved to Ontario at the age of 5. He received his college education at Rochester, New York and he attended Mt. Airy Seminary, Philadelphia from 1897 to 1900. After graduation, he was called by the General Council in America and left for India.

In 1927, Neudoerffer became a professor at Waterloo Seminary and later became President from 1927-1930. He then returned to India in 1931.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1928
A football game on the new Seagram Memorial Field

The field was located behind Willison Hall.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1929
Waterloo College is here to stay

In order for Waterloo College to remain open, $150,000 needed to be raised.

A fundraising campaign was launched in early May and by May 23, 1929 the crisis was averted. In less than a month, $112, 000 of the required amount had been successfully raised.

1929
Female students sitting in a residence common room

The Board of Governors made the decision to admit female students in spring 1929, and the first female students enrolled at Waterloo College in September of the same year.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1930
Frederick B. Clausen

Frederick B. Clausen was president of Waterloo College for twelve years up until his death in 1942.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1931
Louise Twietmeyer

Two years after enrolling at Waterloo College, Louise Twietmeyer graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree. After graduation, Twietmeyer went on to be an instructor of English and French at Waterloo College and later completed her master's degree at the University of Western Ontario.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1931
Convocation

Waterloo College students taking part in the Convocation at the University of Western Ontario.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1935
Female high school students at a track event during the Invitation Games, 1938

The Invitation Games were an annual track and field meet for high schools in the Central Western Ontario Region.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1940
Members of the Waterloo College Contingent, C.O.T.C

Back row: Dave Armstrong, Jim Breithaupt, Bob Binhammer, Gerry Holle

Front row: Jim Cotter, James M. Clark (professor), Bill Warden

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1942
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958)

Carroll Herman Little became acting President to replace Frederick B. Clausen, who had died. He held the post until 1944.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1944
Helmut T. Lehmann

Lehmann's official installation ceremony was held on October 4, 1944.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1945
War memorial

152 students served during the war and sadly, eleven never returned. Gone, but not forgotten, they were:

Sgt. Pilot Douglas Lowe, L.A.C. Richard Wellein, Lt. Norbert C. Jeffers, W/O Charles D. McIntosh, Pte. Craig M. Alles, Capt. W. M. Bean, W/O William C. Thurlow, Flt. Lt. Harold Wills, Major Gordon D. Sim, Lt. William J. Martin and F.O. F. W. Shantz.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1946
Female students outside Lincke House

Within a year, Lincke House proved to be too small to accommodate all the female students. The students moved across the street to the Berdux House, which served as a residence for many years.

From left to right, Hedy Armbruster, professor B. Marion Axford, Lydia Otto, Gladys Foran, Lois Carter, Alice Bald, Faith Weber, Ruth Mills and Shirley Buder.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1950
Boar's Head Dinner, 1955

Today, the Boar's Head Dinner is organized by the Wilfrid Laurier University Students' Union. Students celebrate the last day of fall classes while taking part in a feast, a silent auction and enjoying various entertainment acts.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1950
Keystone editorial staff, 1954-1955

Before 1950, Waterloo College received a few pages in the University of Western Ontario's yearbook, Occidentalia.

Left to right, front row: Jeanette Jarosz, Jean M. Cross (Faculty Advisor), Bill Bishop, Eleanor Brent, Carolyn Gedcke.

Second row: Jerry Hughes, James Heldmann, Gwen Robertson, Bob Schenk, Pat Nevidon, Fred Dahms, Robin Goodchild.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1952
Conrad Hall

In 1954, the residence was officially named Conrad Hall, in honour of Mrs. Jacob Conrad who served as the Women's Auxiliary President for many years. The members of the Auxiliary supplied the furnishings for the residence that housed 22 female students.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1952
Opening ceremony for the Dining Hall

The official opening of the Dining Hall occurred on September 20, 1953. The Dining Hall was located between Willison Hall and Conrad Hall. In 1962, it was demolished in order to create room for the Waterloo Lutheran Seminary building.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1953
J.G. Hagey

Hagey went on to become the founding president of the University of Waterloo.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1953
Homecoming Parade

The majorettes twirling batons in the Waterloo College 1957 Homecoming Parade.

Today, the Homecoming tradition continues where once a year for three days thousands of students and alumni show their Laurier spirit. Homecoming involves a variety of activities, including a football game, a pancake breakfast and class reunions.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1954
Willison Hall at the end of the 1950s

The renovations included transforming classrooms on the second floor into a library, and converting classrooms and science laboratories on the third floor to student bedrooms.

The library is now located where the two students are walking.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1954
Cornerstone laying ceremony

The cornerstone laying ceremony occurred on September 20th, 1953. The building was completed in 1954 and in 1963 an East Wing was added to the Arts Building.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1954
First issue of the Waterlooan

The Waterlooan was a magazine geared towards Alumni of Waterloo College. It only lasted one issue, but then resurfaced in 1957 as This is Waterloo. From 1962 to 1974, the magazine was known as Waterloo Campus. Since 1974, it has been called Laurier Campus.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1955
Cocktail party at the reunion

The first reunion occurred on October 22, 1955 for the graduates of 1929. This image is of the cocktail party that was held at the Walper House Hotel in Kitchener.

Left to right seated: Karen Taylor, Harvey Goos and Barbara Joan Uffelman.

Standing: Unknown.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1956
Board of Governors, 1957

The Board established the Associate Faculties to give courses in engineering and science, to expand the science program while keeping costs down. For two years Waterloo College provided the space and facilities for these Associated Faculties, and supplied the humanities and social sciences needed in that program.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1957
The program brochure for the cornerstone laying ceremony for Seagram Stadium

The official opening of Seagram Stadium and gymnasium was on May 7, 1958.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1959
Pyramid Team spelling 'Waterloo'

The request was approved, and the Associated Faculties became the University of Waterloo.

J.G. Hagey, the current President of Waterloo College, left to become the founding President of the University of Waterloo.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1960
Procession at the 1958 University of Western Ontario spring convocation ceremony

During the affiliation, which lasted for 35 years, over 1,000 Waterloo graduates received their degrees from the University of Western Ontario.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1960
Waterloo Lutheran University

In 1959, the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada applied for a revision of its charter.

This revision was granted, which changed the corporate title to Waterloo Lutheran University and allowed degree granting rights to both the Waterloo Lutheran Seminary and Waterloo University College.

1960
William J. Villaume (1914-1995)

Villaume was a Lutheran minister who pursued prominent careers as a pastor, educator and national religious administrator.

Originally from Brooklyn, Villaume had graduated from Wagner College on Staten Island, began his ministry at St. Peter's in Manhattan and later served as a pastor for churches in Middletown, N.Y., Fitchburg, Mass., and Rindge, N.H.

After accepting the position of first President of Waterloo Lutheran University, Villaume moved to Waterloo with his wife and four children, William, James, Jean and Nancy.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1960
Herman Overgaard (1920-2000)

Herman Overgaard was named the first SBE Director.

The first eight degrees were conferred in May 1962 and the Department of Business Administration and Economics was officially formed in 1966.

Today, with over 4,500 students, 120 full-time faculty and 80 part-time faculty, the Laurier School of Business and Economics is one of the largest business schools in Canada.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1961
Students playing broomball at the 1968 Winter Carnival

Winter Carnival was established as a way of building students' school spirit up after the December holiday. Needless to say, Winter Carnival has turned into a tradition, celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2010. Almost 750 students divided into 21 teams participated in the 50th Winter Carnival, setting a new record.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1961
William Daum Euler (1875-1961)

A former mayor of Berlin, William Daum Euler was Chancellor of Waterloo Lutheran University from May 1961 until his death in July 1961.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1961
Shinerama

In 1961, more than 400 freshmen took to the streets to shine shoes and raise money for a local residence for children with mental and physical disabilities.

In 1978, Laurier's Shinerama program became affiliated with the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Since then, Laurier students have raised more than $2 million for cystic fibrosis research.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1962
The New Seminary

Construction of the new Seminary, located where the original Conrad Hall once stood. The Seminary was dedicated in 1963.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1962
The completed Theatre Auditorium

The new Dining Hall, a Student Union Building, the Theatre Auditorium and West Hall (a men's residence) were completed.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1964
William Ross Macdonald (1891-1976)

The Hon. W. Ross Macdonald was Chancellor of Waterloo Lutheran University from December 1964 to June 1972.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1965
Emily Dolbeer, recipient of the first Master of Social Work degree

Emily Dolbeer was granted the first Master of Social Work degree in 1968. Tuition was $393.32 for a one-year master's and a two-year master's was $90 per course (first year) and $393.32 for the second year.

The Faculty of Graduate Studies was established in 1975.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1965
The New Library

The new library was designed to house 90,000 volumes and 450 student reader positions. It was two floors.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1965
Convocation 1965

In addition to Elash being granted the 1000th degree, she was also granted the first Bachelor of Science degree.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1966
Faculty of Social Work Alumni

Left to right: Sheldon Rahn, Frank Turner, Shankar Yelaja and Maria Saboia attending the alumni luncheon, as part of the tenth anniversary celebration for the Faculty of Social Work, 1976.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1967
Howard Lockhart cutting the net after winning the National Championship

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

1967
Frank C. Peters

Peters was the first President of Wilfrid Laurier University, when the institution changed its name in 1973.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1967
Alumni Hall

The image is of Alumni Hall today, where the Offices of Alumni Relations, Development, Student Recruitment, Communications, Public Affairs and Marketing and University Advancement are located.

The building was originally the residence of Dr. William J. Villaume, President of Waterloo Lutheran University at the time. When Frank C. Peters became President, the building was named Centre Hall. Throughout the 1990s, the building was mainly used as a reception area for Alumni events. Renovations were made to the building throughout 1994-1997 and in 2007 a major addition was added, creating more office space.

1969
Dr. Alvin Woods Building

The five-storey building was originally named the Central Teaching Building, but in 1996, it was renamed the Dr. Alvin Woods Building. In 2007, the building underwent a major renovation.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1970
Student Union Building

When the four-storey building was constructed, only the top two floors of the building were completed, leaving the lower floors as a parking lot. In 1979, the second phase of construction completed the building, by enclosing the bottom two floors.

The building was expanded further in 1995 and in 1997 it was renamed the Fred Nichols Campus Centre, in honour of Fred Nichols, dean of students from 1963-1997.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1972
People attending a Waterloo Lutheran University reception for Chancellor Paul Martin

President Frank C. Peters is facing the camera.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1973
Athletic Complex

Construction for the Athletic Complex began in 1971 and was finished in 1973, containing a gymnasium, 50-meter pool, squash courts, training rooms, classrooms, offices and the Letterman's Lounge.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1973
1973 Convocation

During the 1973 convocation, the Waterloo Lutheran University sign was replaced with Wilfrid Laurier University.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1973
Women's Residence, now Clara Conrad Hall

The other name changes that occurred were:

The other name changes that occurred were: West Hall became W. Ross Macdonald House, East Hall became Nils Willison Hall, South Hall became C.H. Little House, Graduate Residence A became W.D. Euler Residence and Graduate Residence B became Ulrich Leupold Residence.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1974
Fred Nichols

Before the Turret opened in 1974, Fred Nichols was served the first legal drink at a campus bar in 1965.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1974
One of the first co-op program brochures

The Undergraduate Business program was the first program to offer the co-op option. Today, the co-op option is offered to all Arts, Science and Business programs, including three master's programs.

1974
Radio Laurier

In May 2009, Radio Laurier joined the department of Wilfrid Laurier University Student Publications, a media organization on campus and has also recently joined the National Campus and Community Radio Association.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1975
Christine Mather, the first dean of music

On May 1, 1975, Music became its own faculty. Later that year, the Faculty of Graduate Studies was formed.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1977
Earle Shelley (1905-1990) at the 1984 Homecoming football game

Earle Shelley was a graduate from Waterloo College in 1928. Shelley was presented with the Alumni of the Century citation in February 1977 by Wilfrid Laurier University Alumni Association President, Tom Ramautarsingh.

The Major Earle Shelley Lounge, a lounge for female athletes in the Athletic Complex, was named in his honour.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1977
John Aird (right) shaking hands with Alumni Association President, Tom Ramautarsingh (left)

The John Aird Centre was named in honour of Chancellor John Aird.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1978
Neale H. Tayler

Before becoming President, Tayler was a professor and chair of the Department of Romance Languages.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1980
Frank C. Peters Building

Construction of the building began in 1978 and was completed two years later, when it became home to the University's School of Business and Economics. It is named in honour of Frank C. Peters, who was President from 1967-1978.

1981
BACCHUS Laurier was the 1st of its kind in Canada

The mission of BACCHUS Laurier is to promote responsible drinking, sexual responsibility and to deal with social issues pertaining to the health and safety of Wilfrid Laurier University and its students.

1982
John Weir (1930-2007)

Before becoming President and Vice-Chancellor of Wilfrid Laurier University in 1982, Weir was an associate professor of economics at Waterloo Lutheran University.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1983
insideLaurier

The Laureate was published until 1992, when the name changed to Laurier News, which remained until 2002.

The publication then disappeared for six years. In 2008, it resurfaced, but was renamed insideLaurier.

1984
The Library under construction in 1984

This two-floor addition made the Library seven stories high.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1985
The Women's Curling Team, 1985-1986

The Women's Curling team was the first Laurier women's team to win an Ontario Women's Intercollegiate Athletic Association title.

1986
Maureen Forrester

Forrester, one of Canada's greatest contraltos, also received an honourary degree from Laurier in 1975. Laurier's Maureen Forrester Recital Hall is named in her honour.

1986
Bouckaert Hall under construction

Bouckaert Hall is an all female residence, with each floor housing roughly 28 first-year students. Bouckaert Hall is named in honour of Brigitte Bouckaert, a second year don, who tragically passed away after an orientation event in 1985.

1988
John Aird Centre under construction

The John Aird Centre houses the Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, Robert Langen Art Gallery, Theatre Auditorium, classrooms and offices. It is named after John B. Aird, who was Chancellor of Wilfrid Laurier University from 1977-1985.

1990
The Hon. Willard Z. Estey

Prior to becoming Chancellor at Wilfrid Laurier University, Estey served as a Supreme Court Judge for 11 years.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1991
Rich Newbrough holding the Vanier Cup after the 1991 victory

At the 27th Vanier Cup, Wilfrid Laurier University played Mount Allison at the SkyDome in Toronto, ON. A crowd of over 30,000 watched Laurier defeat Mount Allison 25-18 and Andy Cecchini was awarded the Ted Morris Memorial Trophy for being the most valuable player of the game.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

1991
Bricker Residence, 2006

All of the rooms in Bricker Residence are apartment-style and it also houses a laundry room, study room, games room and a large common room.

1991
Peer Help Line

Peer Help Line is a confidential phone service provider offered by the Students' Union for Laurier students by Laurier students as an information, listening and referral service.

1992
The 1992 Women's Championship Team

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

1992
Foot Patrol

The Foot Patrol program is a volunteer-based walk-home service that now has more than 170 volunteers.

1992
Lorna Marsden

Lorna Marsden was the first female President of Wilfrid Laurier University.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Archives

1994
The Emergency Response Team is a service offered by the Students' Union

It is comprised of volunteers who are certified at the Red Cross First Responder level and whose goal is to increase student safety on campus.

1995
The 1995 Women's National Championship Team

Back Row: Kim Notarfranco, Kelly Marinoff, Sheri Cotton, Camilla Vejvalka, Rachael Zuidervliet, Lidia Pawlikowski, Lisa Pfeiffer, Karen Conboy, Emmie Hull, Suzie Dobson
Middle Row: Stephanie Reyes, Carrie Ashdown, Carolyn Arthur, Kara Yates, Lorraine Hodds, Belise Abwunza, Alexa Hodgkinson, Celeste Burkiô, Sarah Lennon
Front Row: Courtney Pollock (Trainer), Lynn Forsyth (Assistant Coach), Helen Stoumbos (Assistant Coach), Michelle Humann (Captain), Barry MacLean (Head Coach), Kristen Hacker (Trainer)

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

1995
The Science Building under construction

The building itself cost $15 million, and the entire project cost $18.3 million, including equipment, furnishings and renovations to existing facilities.

1995
L.U.C.K.

L.U.C.K.'s purpose is to raise awareness and monetary donations for local charities and community causes within the greater Kitchener/Waterloo community. Some of the annual fundraising events for selected charities include: Murder Mystery, the Blood Donor Clinic and the Charity Auction.

1996
Cleghorn was Laurier's seventh Chancellor

John E. Cleghorn was Chancellor of Wilfrid Laurier University from October 1996 to June 2003. He is the former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Royal Bank of Canada.

1997
Rosehart at the 1998 convocation

Prior to his post as President of Wilfrid Laurier University, Rosehart was the President of Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, ON.

1999
Brantford Campus Grand Opening, October 1, 1999

Ribbon cutting with first Dean of Brantford Art Read, Brantford Mayor Chris Friel, Colleen Miller of the Grand Valley Educational Society and President of Wilfrid Laurier University, Dr. Rosehart.

The Brantford Campus opened with 40 students and 2 faculty members. Today, the campus is home to more than 2,500 students.

2000
A-Team

The A-Team (Activities Team) is a part of the Students' Union. These volunteers work to provide various activities that students can enjoy, such as concerts and comedy nights.

2000
The Faculty of Science

The Faculty of Science has grown to seven departments and in 2003 it began offering its first PhD program.

2000
The 2000 Men's National Championship Team

The Men's Soccer team earned their first CIAU gold after defeating St. Mary's University during penalty kicks, with the final score being 6-5.

Back Row: Dave Thomas, Chris Booth, Stu McLaren, Mike Berry, Pieter Meuleman, Jon Miller, Andy Guidi, Alex Kameda
Middle Row: Andy Incitti, Braden Douglas, Wojciech Cwik, Joel Abwunza, Sean Preece, Dave Blicharski, Keith MacCuish, Kenny Nutt
Front Row: Barry MacLean (Head Coach), Jimmy Ro, Daniel Pilas, Ken Cartmill, Mario Halapir (Associate Coach), Jim McKellar (Goalkeeping Coach)
Absent: Steve Cox, Dan Glibota

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

2001
The 2001 CIS Championship Team

On November 11, 2001 at the Huskies Stadium in Halifax, NS, the Men's Soccer team successfully defended their title as National Champions from the previous year by defeating the University of British Columbia 2-1.

Back Row: Braden Douglas, Dave Nutt, Kenny Nutt, Stu McLaren, Chris Booth, Jon Miller
Middle Row: Barry MacLean (Head Coach), Dave Blicharski, Shawn Wigger, Niki Budalic, Steve Cox, Jason Lyall, Kordo Doski, Mario Halapir (Associate Coach)
Front Row: Alex Kameda, Joel Abwunza, Ali Zamani, Pieter Meuleman, Paul McHenry, Keith MacCuish
Absent: Wojciech Cwik, Manuel Carona, Jim McKellar (Goalkeeping Coach)

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

2002
The Schlegel building under construction

The Schlegel Centre for Entrepreneurship is inspired by the vital role entrepreneurs play in the Canadian economy, and is driven by a desire to educate and create opportunities for students in the area of entrepreneurship.

2002
Waterloo College Hall

Waterloo College Hall is a five-storey residence building that houses 320 first year students.

2003
The Hon. Bob Rae

Before coming to Laurier, Rae was sworn in as the first NDP premier of Ontario on October 1, 1990.

2004
A few of the players celebrating after their victory

The Wilfrid Laurier Gold Hawks defeated the three-time CIS Champion, Alberta Pandas, 4-1 to claim the CIS gold in front of a crowd of over 750 people. This was the first time the Women's Hockey team had won this National Championship.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

2005
The players celebrating after their victory

On December 3, 2005, Wilfrid Laurier University defeated the University of Saskatchewan 13-8 at the Ivor Wynne Stadium in Hamilton, ON, to claim the title of Vanier Cup Champions.

Over 16,000 people came to watch the game and Ryan Pyear was awarded the Ted Morris Memorial Trophy for being the most valuable player of the game.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

2006
The Lyle S. Hallman Faculty of Social Work

Laurier's Lyle S. Hallman Faculty of Social Work (FSW) formally opened its new Kitchener facility and commemorated the FSW's 40th anniversary at celebration events held on Thursday, September 28, 2006. Laurier received a heritage award for outstanding achievement in refurbishing the original 1907 building that was home to St. Jerome's high school.

2006
The Student Food Bank

The Student Food Bank was established in order to better serve the dietary and nutritional needs of Laurier students.

2007
Laurier's China office opens

The office is based at Chongqing University, to promote academic collaboration, research partnerships and faculty and student exchanges.

2007
Faculty of Education grand opening

Unveiling of a photo of the first faculty and student body of the Faculty of Education during the grand opening.

2007
Championship Team

On December 1st, the Laurier Cheerleading team took first place in the All-Girls Division at the 23rd Annual University National Cheerleading Championships at the Powerade Centre in Brampton. The Golden Hawks also won the all-girls championship the following year, making it their second consecutive championship.

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

2007
Construction of the Co-operative Education and Career Development Centre

This building provides students access to career advising, employment services, job search workshops and one-on-one appointments with career consultants.

2007
Championship Team

The Women's Curling team struck gold when they defeated the University of Manitoba 7-4, in ten ends of play, during the CIS final.

Left to right: Ken McCormack (Head Coach), Hollie Nicol, Alex Hughes, Erica Butler, Danielle Inglis, Laura Hickey, Tracy O'Leary, Hilary McDermott, John Nicol (Assistant Coach)

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

2007
Blouw making a speech at his installation

Born in Holland, Dr. Blouw moved to Canada in 1957. He holds bachelor's and master's of science degrees in zoology from the University of Manitoba and a PhD in biology from the University of New Brunswick.

Dr. Blouw joined the University after a distinguished career at the University of Northern British Columbia and many years of teaching at St. Francis Xavier University.

2007
Championship Team

The Men's Curling team defeated the University of Calgary 9-4 to win the CIS title. The team advanced to the national gold after defeating Brock University 10-2 in only six ends of play during the semi-finals.

Left to right: Ken McCormack (Head Coach), Scott McGregor, Bill Francis, Paul Arkilander, Matthew Mapletoft, Dave Kaun, Mike Anderson, John Nicol (Assistant Coach)

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

2008
John Pollock

Pollock, a well-known businessman and philanthropist, led Kitchener-based Electrohome Ltd., which was founded by his grandfather in 1907.

Pollock earned a Bachelor of Applied Science from the University of Toronto and an MBA from Harvard University.

2008
Championship Team

The Wilfrid Laurier Golden Hawk Women's Curling team repeated as national champions as they defeated the Saint Mary's Huskies 6-4 at the Royal Montreal Curling Club at the CIS Championships. This earned Laurier their 11th CIS Banner.

Left to right: John Nichol (Assistant Coach), Sarah Wilkes, Hilary McDermott, Laura Crocker, Danielle Inglis and Hollie Nichol

Photograph courtesy of Laurier Athletics

2009
Opening reception of the Toronto Office

The office is located on the main floor of the Exchange Tower, and serves the many alumni and co-op students who live and work in Toronto. It also helps us deliver innovative programs, such as our weekend-format MBA.

2010
Wilfrid Laurier University's 100th anniversary

The yearlong celebration leading up to Wilfrid Laurier University's 100th anniversary launched on the Waterloo campus on Monday, October 18 with events for staff and faculty, and students. A special kick-off at the Brantford campus will be held on Wednesday, October 20.